silhouette of an oak branch lenghwise

Oak Limb Longwise

My art usually emphasizes texture–patterns governing patterns, but not with machine-like precision, allowing rather for individual variability–perhaps we could call it “patterns with character.” I guess this is why I’ve always liked trees–branch, bark, leaf, and crown–living patterns with character.

I have a whole group of pieces called “Up a Tree” and always look for opportunities to photograph literally straight up through a tree–especially a really big tree–trying to capture two-dimensionally something of its great three-dimensional form and character. (Usually you can’t.)

This piece is a variation of that–not straight up, but straight out. The limb hung low enough and grew long enough, and the ground sloped steeply enough that I found that perfect point of view.

In full color it works OK. The sky was pale that day, so the background was already nearly white, and I tried it as a silhouette and liked it better.

Originally I just called it “Oak Inkblot,” but I thought the title needed to explain more about where it came from. This suggests a deeper meaning–how one’s point of view can radically affect what one sees. (Does that make it fine art? /8^> )

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What the camera saw:
oak limb longwise, as shot

Yes I did “photoshop out” those leaves on the upper left from the neighboring tree. I don’t usually alter photographs like that, preferring to work with what’s there, but if something minor ruins an otherwise beautiful picture, then it goes.

What a bystander would see:
oak limb longwise, bystander(The Limb is the on in the middle of this picture.)

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